Skip to main content

About your Search

20110701
20110731
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
the world and back here at home, hi, everybody, we're so glad you're with us, i'm jenna lee. jon: and i'm jon scott. "happening now," capitol hill gridlock just days before a default deadline. right now there is no bipartisan teal on the table and no vote today on house speaker john boehner's plan to raise the debt ceiling. august 2nd is just six short days away, and that leaves the very real prospect of default or a credit downgrade. can washington make a deal? wendall goler, our senior thousands foreign affairs correspondent be live on the north lawn for us now. >> reporter: more tough news today from the congressional budget office which says both of the leading plans from republicans and democrats to cut the deficit and raise the debt ceiling fall short of what their authors claim. senate majority leader harry reid's plan would actually cut half a trillion less from the deficit than he says it would, house speaker john boehner's plan falls about $350 billion short. boehner has canceled plans for a vote on his proposal today and gone back to the drawing board, and since he has promis
's asking tab to send in your questions. in. jon: and this fox news alert out of minnesota where the governor just signed a new budget ending one of the longest-ever state government shutdowns. harris is live with the breaking story for us. harris? is. >> reporter: yeah. there were a lot of people wondering how this one would come together. minnesota governor mark dayton has just signed an agreement he struck with leading republicans after months of very bitter arguments over taxes and spending cuts. they were trying to close a pretty sizable deficit in their spending there, and they have been brutal on this issue for quite some time. you see some video from early on in those discussions, people on all sides of the issue. the government shut down july 1st, and that laid off 22,000 state employees, stopped road projects, people couldn't get licensing for all sorts of things like fishing and what not be, and it's a big recreational state. it cost the state millions in be lost revenue from lottery sales, tax audits, park fees and licensing fees, so on and so forth, but now they can
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)